Tips on how to be more productive

Give up.
Procrastinate.
Work less.
Get rejected.
Do an impossible task.

Is your brain hurting? Is there a typo in the headline? These sound more like a ideas for how to get canned. But this article raises some great points.

I’ve been watching some interesting videos on YouTube around how thought processes and the brain works (I highly recommend checking out the BBC show “Horizons” for great programs on intelligence and how to make better decisions … and more, of course). At first I was thinking that this kind of list is more about “tricking the brain” or using reverse psychology. And in one way you can look at it like that. However, what I find more interesting is the concept that, according to some brain-mapping experiments, when one is faced with a choice, the amygdala seems active. This is the area of the brain that deals with emotions. So for me, it is about understanding how my emotions work rather than purposefully playing mind games on myself.

And that is what I like about this list below. It is not about trying to convince yourself that your to-do list is manageable, it is more about how to better manage yourself, your thoughts, and even your emotions.

Image10 of the most controversial productivity tips that actually work
by Leo Widrich, Buffer

We’ve all heard what makes us more productive. To be more productive, get: Better sleep, better food, better work environment, etc. And I think these tips are amazing and a great focus to have. Heck, we even wrote about most of these and the science behind it here on the Buffer blog.

And yet, today, I thought of changing it up dramatically. It goes nicely with Tim Ferriss’ moto: “To do the impossible, you need to ignore the popular.”

Read the full article

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Time keeps on slippin’ slippin’

The mind is an interesting thing. I think what makes it so interesting, though, is that it isn’t JUST the mind working alone. It is your heart, your soul, your body, your home, your relationships … it all works together.

I’ve been in a bit of a slump for the past month or so. Funny enough, I’ve been going to the gym pretty much every day since the middle of January, and while I love it and the energy it brings, the rest of me/life hasn’t been coming along for the ride.

But yesterday, as if someone (that being me) flipped the proverbial switch, I seemed to reconcile it all at once and started pushing forward. And it happened as I was making a tutorial on how to use a CMS to update my organization’s website (Community Radio Fund of Canada) for our new program officer. I was imagining presenting it to the new employee when it hit me … starting next week, I’m going to have another full-time permanent employee working with me in the office.

No joke, it has been 10 years almost to the day that I have been working alone in an office. There have been temporary assistants, project coordinators, and summer students, not to mention almost countless board directors and other volunteers. But since I started the office for the NCRA on February 25, 2002, I have been working in isolation in my office. So when I started imagining orienting a new staff person, imagining walking down our little hall to talk to her about our daily goings-on, maybe chatting over lunch in the board room once in a while, … well, I started to get a bit excited.

What an excellent way to chase away those mid-February blues. On my way to work this morning, I realized I hadn’t noticed I had been in a funk. My winter was quietly slipping away and I hadn’t been paying attention. Total denial, really. But now everything feels back on track.

Plug time: For any community radio folks following this, if you haven’t already, visit the CRFC‘s website to subscribe to our newsletter or to follow us on Facebook and Twitter. (Links updated November 2013)

A Change Will Do You Good

It’s been raining for a few days in Ottawa, just after the beginning of summer. It doesn’t help that I’m trying to write four different major documents for work and I’m a little stressed about the writer’s block I seem to be suffering. But I came across this list, and I think I’m going to try a few. It won’t be all 60, but I’m hoping the ones I do pick will be the pebbles I need to make enough ripples to change the tide. It’s either that or just count the days to my next vacation. Sometimes that does the trick, but since I don’t know when that will be, and that is too much like living for the destination, I think I’ll take my chances with a few of these following journey tips.

60 Small Ways to Improve Your Life in the Next 100 Days
Written by Marelisa
From the blog: The Best Article Every Day

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to make drastic changes in order to notice an improvement in the quality of your life. At the same time, you don’t need to wait a long time in order to see the measurable results that come from taking positive action. All you have to do is take small steps, and take them consistently, for a period of 100 days.

Below you’ll find 60 small ways to improve all areas of your life in the next 100 days.

Click here for the rest of the article.

The Times and How They Are Indeed Changing

What a busy summer! I’ve barely had time to recover from a wonderful Maritime summer vacation, going full time at my job (and what a life change that will be!), getting ready to move from my apartment, and just thinking about what the future holds for me. The big news that sparked all of this recuperating, reflection, and rethinking? After a year of letters, conversations, and a hearing, the CRTC issued its new Campus and Community Radio Policy in July!

It (of course) contains various regulations for campus and community broadcasters, such as how much local spoken word they need to produce, or how much Canadian music they need to play. But it also includes a mechanism for some much needed funding for the sector. And who will be managing and distributing those funds, you might ask? The organization I work for — the Community Radio Fund of Canada. What a proud moment for me. For sure, I have played my part in that. But I also think back to the summer of 2004 when four or five people first started talking about a radio fund. What a journey it has been since then. It’s amazing how it feels like yesterday and a lifetime ago.

For those who are interested and have not yet seen it, here’s the CRTC-published policy as well as a press release from my organization. And congrats to us all!

Broadcasting Regulatory Policy CRTC 2010-499: Campus and community radio policy (July 22, 2010)

CRTC DECISION PROVIDES BOOST FOR CAMPUS-COMMUNITY RADIO, BUT A LOT OF WORK STILL TO BE DONE

A First for the Sector: $775K annually from broadcasting industry

Ottawa, July 22, 2010 — The Community Radio Fund of Canada (CRFC) is pleased to announce that the campus and community radio sector will receive vital funding following the decision released today by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on the Review of the Campus and Community Radio Policies.

The Commission approved part of the CRFC’s request for mandatory funding from the private broadcasting sector through contributions to the Canadian Content Development (CCD). Once in place, this will mean that the CRFC will likely receive $775,000 annually. This funding will then be distributed through the CRFC’s programs to more than 140 stations and their representative associations.

“This is a encouraging step in funding for the sector,” said CRFC President Ian Pringle. “With this funding, we will be able to begin providing more meaningful support to stations across the country as they work to better serve their communities, tackle the challenges of 21st-century broadcasting in innovative ways and give voice to Canada’s diverse experience where it is the richest – at the local level.”

Since its inception in 2007, the CRFC has already distributed more than $300,000 to support 42 local programming and training initiatives across the country. From youth radio camps, to a series about local history, to training immigrant women to tell their own stories, these projects have had immediate and direct impact for stations and Canadian communities.

The CRFC thanks the Commission for recognizing the importance of campus and community stations, both in the broadcasting system and for Canadians. With this funding, our stations will be able to better serve their local communities by producing strong locally relevant Canadian content.

However, this funding is just a start in helping the CRFC fulfill its mandate. Pringle notes: “We did not get everything we asked for, but this decision remains a step forward in the growth of community programming. There is a lot of work still to be done, and we are ready to take it on.”

The CRFC also believes that this funding will have a significant and meaningful impact on the promotion of local Canadian talent. For decades, our stations have been committed to providing exposure and airplay emerging, independent, local, and/or niche musicians. By strengthening campus and community stations, the Commission and the private broadcasters are also directly contributing to the Canadian music industry.

For more information about the CRFC, please visit www.communityradiofund.org.

Getting back to the WordPress grind

This is a post aimed at any regular readers of my blog. Sorry it’s been a while since my last post. I’ve been thinking about the blog lately and have been saving up things to post. It’s mostly all non-profit resources. I haven’t had the chance to keep up on other things. We just finished announcing the recipients of grants from the Community Radio Fund of Canada for the second year (yippee!). Combined with other regular life stuff, I find when my time and energy is limited, my online presence is the first thing to go. So thanks for the check-up messages. Content will be coming soon. In the meantime, go enjoy that beautiful weather (that -most- of us are having, anyway)!